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ALLERGY TREATMENT

Most allergies can be improved or even cured with immunotherapy. However, many people are not aware that immunotherapy sublingual drops are an alternative to allergy shots. Both drops and shots have benefits and drawbacks. 

 

DO ALLERGY SHOTS AND DROPS WORK?

 

Allergy symptoms can include headache, watery eyes, sneezing, nasal congestion or a runny nose. If you have asthma, then allergies can aggravate it. Many people with allergies have other problems like chronic sinusitis.

 

Both allergy shots and sublingual drops have been used safely and effectively.  Both use small amounts of allergens (what causes your allergies) to gradually desensitize your response to the substances that cause your allergic reactions.  By controlling and reducing allergy symptoms, one can also reduce sinus infection and chronic sinusitis.

 

ALLERGY SHOTS

 

Allergy shots have been around for over a century, trying to reduce patients’ sensitivity to allergens. For many patients, the allergy shots have eliminated or strongly reduce allergy symptoms. Therapy can take as long as three to five years to work.

This is an FDA established treatment and allergy shots are typically covered by insurance, which makes them a more affordable option for some patients. The major problem with allergy shots is the need for frequent office visits and the waiting time after an injection. This requires a significant time commitment. 

 

ALLERGY DROPS

 

Allergy drops use the same antigens that are used in allergy shots.  Allergy drops are administered daily under the tongue.

Allergy drops allow you to make many fewer clinic visits than allergy shots. Since drops are given, no shots are needed and this is a great option if you are afraid of needles. Allergy drops also may take three to five years to work. 

Allergy drops are considered an off-label use of FDA-approved antigen therapy. Your insurance may not cover the cost of the drops stating it is experimental.  However, most insurance companies may cover the cost of your office visits and allergy testing. A  Health Savings Account or Flex Spending Account can be used to pay for sublingual immunotherapy.